Fall/Winter- The Best Time to Seed Your Pollinator Garden (or prep it)

Updated: Nov 16, 2021

I've just seeded my yard with annual red clover because I love the color and it's a great bee feeder. In the shady areas I put in a mix including Dutchman's britches, Solomon's seal, false solomon's seal, columbine, various mints, and a lot more. In the sunnier areas several aster species, echinacea, tickseed, coreopsis, cosmos, side oats gramma, and more will provide color from spring through now. My cosmos and echinacea (coneflower) are still in bloom?!?

It's a long Autumn this side of the Appalachians. So, still time to prep and seed for the Spring. If you're looking to increase your cut-flower options for next year and your opportunity to see colorful butterflies, then now is the time to select some seeds and spread them (daytime temps in low 60s and 30s to mid 40s at night). Most plant seeds do well to exposure of winter temps and freeze thaws. If they are covered by a leafy mulch they will also respond well to the chemicals leaching out of those decaying leaves. Many plant seeds require a chemical (or two) or freeze/thaw temps to break down their might seeds coats and signal to the embryo withing - start growing when it gets warm enough.


I've just seeded my yard with annual red clover because I love the color and it's a great bee feeder. In the shady areas I put in a mix including Dutchman's britches, solomon's seal, false solomon's seal, columbine, various mints, and a lot more. In the sunnier areas several aster species, echinacea, tickseed, coreopsis, cosmos, side oats gramma, and more will provide color from spring through now. My cosmos and echinacea (coneflower) are still in bloom?!?


If you've a native plant grower near you - find out what they recommend. We are lucky enough to have the https://www.nativeplantrescuesquad.org/ here. Joy and Gerry are a wealth of knowledge about the local flora and who likes to grow next to whom. They also provide us with plants salvaged from developments at prices just enough to support their continued work.


If you want to reduce the size of your lawn in favor of more pollinators, please contact us! We would love to help you reduce the cost and labor while increasing the beauty in your garden. A great resource to learn more about the benefits of pollinator and food gardening can be found here:

https://www.ecolandscaping.org/


21 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All